#mondaymood: HEY LITTLE GIRL 🎀


Any teenager would admit that their bedroom is the perfect opportunity to show off their personal style. Beyond being just a space for resting, it's where they spend time playing with friends, catching up on homework assignments, and enjoying their favourite games. It's only right that a teen's bedroom would be full of everything they love, whether it's high-energy colour choices, unique storage solutions for displaying their books and toys, or a striking bed design.


The importance of a teenager's bedroom it's also very important in their journey. It can be a sanctuary for them to express themselves and feel safe. What goes into your teenager’s bedroom can be incredibly valuable in shaping who they are as people. Being a teenager means trying to figure out who you are while you have very little to your name. When a teenager feels like they can’t claim anything for themselves, it can be frustrating for teenagers and parents alike. A teenager might not be able to articulate these ideas, but when they’re in a bedroom that is their own, they can feel incredibly at peace. Your own bedroom should provide you with a sense of comfort and space, and that’s the same for teens. Show your teen how much you care by providing them with an excellent bedroom and some much needed space.

Crafting the perfect girl's bedroom is all about choosing the right layout, furniture, and colour palette. Plus, there needs to be a dose of creativity and playfulness—two elements that never fail to enhance a child's room design. Designing a girl’s room is known to be a struggle, as creating a world that would allow a young girl to feel enjoyed, relaxed and home-y is a real big step.


You might not typically associate teens with interior design. However, just because a teenager doesn’t have experienced decorating other rooms, it doesn’t mean that they don’t have their own sense of taste. When you brainstorm a bedroom with a teenager, you can really see their mind at work. Provide them the option to use some old furniture and decorations you have in storage. For designing start with furniture placement. Where should the bed go and where should the desk and dresser go? What kind of colours would work best for the walls? Do your best to restrain yourself from making all the choices. Even if you don’t agree with every choice your teenager makes for their bedroom, it’s important for you to let them make their own decisions as they head into adulthood.

While you shouldn’t call all the shots when decorating a teen bedroom, you should give them necessary guidance. They’ll appreciate not having to make all the decisions themselves, and you will definitely want to share some budget-friendly options. Be sure to focus on the essential components first. These include the bed, dresser, and desk. They should all match one another. Similar materials should be kept in mind, such as having a wooden desk and a wooden dresser. Select furniture items that complement your hardwood flooring or carpeting. You also need to consider how the decor matches the paint or wallpaper. If the paint clashes or is fading, you might need to repaint.

After these important decisions have been made, you can move onto secondary matters. These include any posters or art that is hung up. Your teenager should be able to express these tastes. However, you have the right to speak up if anything they want to put up is offensive or worrisome. Be sure to speak with them honestly about any plans for their bedroom that you’re concerned about.


• Flexible display space •



Changing tastes and varied interests are part and parcel of teenage life. As a result, posters, prints and photos can be put up and taken down with dizzying speed as loyalties shift.

If you want to protect bedroom walls from the frequent application of sticky tape and Blu-Tack, think about making space for a pegboard, pinboard or magnetic panel instead, so items can be pinned up and taken down as many times as your teen’s heart desires, without ruining paint or wallpaper.


 A study spot •



Homework really starts to build up during the teenage years, so if you want to get your child into a regular study schedule, and you have the space, a quiet corner for working is a good idea.


At its simplest, this can just be a slim desk or shelf against the wall, with a good task light and space for organising notes, books and pens. Wall-mounted storage is also useful to help corral study notes and loose papers, as well as a small stool that can be tucked out of the way under the desk when not in use.


• Cosy lighting & blackout blinds •


A mix of lighting is important in any room, but particularly in a teen bedroom, which needs to cater for different moods throughout the day.


Bright task lighting is important near the desk for homework, and also by the bed for reading. But in tandem with that, softer, relaxed lighting, such as fairy lights or warm table lamps, are good for helping to create a cosy den when homework is done for the day and the room needs to transition into a space where your teen can relax.


Sleep is important at every age, but especially so during the teenage years, so a dark, calm sleep environment should be a key part of the bedroom design.

Blackout blinds or lined curtains are the best way to control light levels and block out street lamps or early morning sunshine.

Other sources of light, such as screens or electrical chargers, should be switched off every evening. In addition, devices should be turned onto night mode after dark to help with the wind-down process.


• Closed storage & plenty of room for clothes •

When children are little, toy storage is essential in a playroom or bedroom. But as they grow, this need for storage multiplies as they add larger clothes, bigger shoes, school books and hobby equipment into the equation.

To keep the majority of these items out of sight, invest in as much closed storage as you can manage, from chests of drawers and blanket boxes to built-in cupboards. Anything that has a door is your friend here, so clutter can be swept out of sight and tidy habits gently encouraged.


Clothes are a big part of self-expression, and it’s key to have space to display (and admire) them in a teenage bedroom. To avoid a ‘floordrobe’ situation, clothes storage should always err on the side of more rather than less.

A combination of practical shelves with some hooks or a rail will allow for everyday clothes to be neatly stored out of sight while a few favourite clothes can be displayed and admired. On a related note, a laundry bin is also a good addition if space allows.


• Play with creativity •


Creativity plays a huge role in the lives of all of us, and we often forget to play. Encourage your little one to play with their creativity and always allow them to have fun. Create a special. spot in their room where they can get messy and have fun while exploring the hobby that they enjoy.









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